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Bebop Spoken There

Danny Halperin: "Johnny Griffin is possibly the worst tenor saxophonist who has come to widespread public attention in the past decade." – (Jazz News, March 21, 1962).

Polly Gibbons: “If Billie [Holiday] had come up in the ’60s, she probably would have been a soul singer” – (Down Beat August 2017).

Archives

Today Wednesday August 16

Afternoon
Vieux Carre Jazzmen - Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 3OS. 1pm. Free.
Maine Street Jazzmen - Tynemouth Metro Station, Station Tce., Tynemouth NE30 4RE. 1pm. Free.
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Evening.
New Orleans Jazz at the Village Hall - Springwell Village Community Venue, Fell Rd., Gateshead NE9 7RP. 8:15pm. £3.
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Take it to the Bridge - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. £1. 8pm.
Billy's Acoustic Blues - Billy Bootleggers, 28 Nelson St., Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free (weekly).
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Tees Hot Club - Cleveland Bay, 718 Yarm Rd., Eaglescliffe TS16 0JE. 9pm. Free.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Joy Ellis Quartet @ The Jazz Café - May12

Joy Ellis (piano & vocals), James Kitchman (guitar), Henrik Jensen (double bass) & Adam Osmianski (drums)
(Review by Russell/Photos courtesy of Mike Tilley)
This Newcastle Jazz Café date previewing her forthcoming CD Life on Land was a first opportunity for a Tyneside jazz audience to hear singer-songwriter pianist Joy Ellis. The London-based Ellis is fortunate in being able to work with many of the best musicians on the scene. Three of them made the journey north to perform two sets of Ellis’ compositions, some of which feature on her new CD, some yet to have a title. A select gathering on Pink Lane thoroughly enjoyed listening to Ellis and her band – James Kitchman, guitar, Henrik Jensen, double bass, and drummer Adam Osmianski.

Joy Ellis’ soon-to-be-released new album is, in part, inspired by her observations of life in London. Ellis the vocalist sings with an innate sense of optimism, her lyrics a framework from which she and her band mates, particularly Kitchman, improvise. A composition with no name temporarily labelled Something was one of two or three in embryonic form. Others – The Jazz Man, the timely Refugee performed as a trio (minus Kitchman), Here in the Quiet, From Dusk Til Dawn – were accomplished pieces with the quartet fully engaged, frequently exchanging smiles, things were going well.

Drummer Adam Osmianski, a new face on Tyneside, works in the Latin jazz field and his energetic performance enthused band mates and audience alike. Bassist Henrik Jensen, a bandleader in his own right, is a commanding figure and on this gig played the unobtrusive anchor role. The Dane is no stranger to the Jazz Café having played a memorable gig with his band Followed by Thirteen in February 2014. Guitarist James Kitchman bagged the majority of the solos. An unassuming young man, Kitchman crafted several excellent solos which were clearly to the liking of Ellis. Kitchman is another north east success story. Hailing from the Tyne valley, the then mid-teens guitarist walked into the Chillingham Arms one Wednesday evening hoping to sit-in at Dave Weisser’s long-running jazz workshop. The rest – bright lights, big city – is, as they say, history.

The Joy Ellis Quartet will launch her new album – Life on Land – at the Dean Street Pizza Express in London on Sunday 5 November. It’s a lunchtime session (1:30pm). A London ‘away day’ sounds like a good idea.           
Russell.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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