Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Mundell Lowe: “...we also had to play for a floor show, which consisted of girls dancing--some of 'em were dressed, some of 'em were not so dressed.” – (Crescendo September 1974).

Brew Moore: "I played so many strip joints I was 21 before I saw a naked woman from the front." - (Downbeat July 24, 1969).

Number 24

Bebop Spoken Here is currently listed at number 24 (-2) in the WORLD JAZZ BLOG Rankings!

Today Friday June 23.

Afternoon
Rendezvous Jazz - The Black Horse, Front St., Monkseaton, Whitley Bay NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.
-----
Noel Dennis Trio - Gala Theatre, Millennium Place, Durham DH1 1WA. 1pm. £5.
-----
Evening
SouLutions - Hoochie Coochie, 54 Pilgrim St., Newcastle NE1 6SF. 9pm. £7.
Paul Skerritt Band - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 9pm. £7 (£6 in advance).
Box Wallet - Billy Bootleggers - 28 Nelson St., Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.
-----
Horace Silverman & the White Gardenias - Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. 7:30pm. £7.50.
-----
Hot Club du Nord - Queen's Hall, Beaumont St., Hexham NE46 3LX. 8pm. £10. SOLD OUT!
-----
Steve Bone - Al Forno, 81 Skinnergate, Darlington DL3 7LX. 7pm.
-----
To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, May 05, 2017

Chris Potter Quartet @ Pizza Express Stage, Cheltenham Jazz Festival - April 30.

Chris Potter (saxophones), David Virelles (piano), Joe Martin (bass), Marcus Gilmore (drums).
(Review by Steve T)
Finally got around to buying the Aziza album as preparation for this and was struck, given Chick Corea would be the preceding gig, how it reminded me of Return to Forever. I nearly saw Aziza (Potter, Dave Holland, Lionel Louke and Eric Harland) at London last year and was surprised to be told I saw Potter with Pat Metheny a few years back.
With the education system, private tuition, brilliant educators and more money to pay for them all, it's perfectly possible to produce musicians approximating the calibre of McCoy Tyner, Elvin Jones, Jimmy Garrison and even Trane. They can make great music but the shock factor of the propulsion into unchartered territory has gone. 
Lance has just reviewed the album from which much of this set was taken, and while ostensibly we seem to disagree, I totally agree this music looks forward as well as back as it seems to stand outside time. I once read that the world would never catch up with Beethoven or Trane, and while I don't think that's true of Ludvig Von, I suspect it is of Trane and I wish I could recall who said it as I often taunt Trane deniers with it.
That's not to say this is in any way a Trane tribute band as I hear countless influences in their music, but to recognise the pervasive influence of Trane on every Jazz musician since, and particularly saxophonists.
Some pieces were more melody driven than others but there was lots of freedom throughout, Potter taking the most solo time, though straightforward definitions were often mute. All are superb musicians and Potter quite extraordinary. Piano solos seemed shorter or were perhaps more easily pinpointed and the first drum solo earned him rapturous applause.
Potter made announcements every couple of pieces, advising us they would finish with the title track of the album - the Dreamer is the Dream - where he played the intro on soprano before switching back to tenor, followed by a blues. Martin took the obligatory bass solo but only really got to show his chops during a sprint to the finish, as piano dropped out. Bass followed leaving an incredible sax/drums workout before the goosebumps’
moment when piano and bass came back in but, great as he was, we didn't need another drum solo, but audiences seem to love them at a time when most rock bands are trying to lose them.
It should have been brilliant and it was, so why didn't it feel like it? It could have been me but others agreed. 
Steve T.

No comments :

Post a Comment

Blog Archive

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Subscribe!