Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Orrin Evans: “I’d like to see a younger audience and an audience that looks more like me at the clubs.” – (Down Beat November 2014).

Kevin Flanagan: "Besides, I'd got sick of playing jazz to people who looked like my father." - (Straight No Chaser Issue 0ne Summer 1988.)

Archives

Today Thursday August 17

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Rd., nr. Newcastle NE27 0DA. 1:oopm. Free.
Rendezvous Jazz - Tynemouth Metro Station, Station Tce., Tynemouth NE30 4RE. 1pm. Free.
-----
Evening.
Indigo Jazz Voices - Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4. 7:30pm. £5.
Maine Street Jazzmen - Potter's Wheel, Sunniside NE16 5EE. 8:30pm. Free.
-----
Tees Valley Jazzmen - White Horse Hotel, Burtree Lane, Harrogate Hill, Darlington DL1 3AD. 1:30pm. Free.
-----
Tees Hot Club w.Kevin Eland (trumpet); Mark Toomey (alto); Dave Archibold (keys)- Dormans, Oxford Rd., Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. Free. 9pm.
New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.01642 678129.
-----
To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday August 18

Afternoon
Rendezvous Jazz - The Black Horse, Front St., Monkseaton, Whitley Bay NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.
Levee Ramblers New Orleans Quartet - Tynemouth Metro Station, Station Tce., Tynemouth NE30 4RE. 1pm. Free.
-----
Evening
Kentucky Cowtippers - Billy Bootleggers, 28 Nelson St., Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.
Ray Johnson & Richard Herdman - Prohibition Bar, Arch 3, Brandling St., Gateshead NE8 2BA. 8pm.
-----
Steve Bone - Al Forno, 81 Skinnergate, Darlington DL3 7LX. 7pm.
-----
To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

CD Reviews: Frank Kohl Quartet – Rising Tide. Sandro Zerafa – More Light.

(Reviews by Steve T)
Rising Tide
Frank Kohl (guitar), Steve LaSpina (bass), Tommy Kohl (piano), Jon Doty (drums).
This is Kohl’s fourth album, the first being in 1981. He's a native of New York, where these sessions come from, but is generally based in Seattle. From the Beatles in the sixties his training and tastes progressed through Clapton, Hendrix and the blues to Wes Montgomery with Jimmy Smith, Pat Martino and Jim Hall, but it was seeing Tony Williams' Lifetime with Larry Young and John McLaughlin that made him realise anything was possible in Jazz.
Kohl studied at Berklee during its guitar golden age, while Schofield and Metheny were still students.
The album features eight tracks, including five originals, a live version of Rodgers and Hart’s My Romance and two by Victor Young, including a solo guitar piece to close the album.
Nothing much else to say except the songs are fine and the playing is excellent and the notes claim that  smooth exteriors and genuinely emotional interiors make for a difficult balance and listeners will decide whether he pulls this off. I think he probably does but my heckles don't automatically burst through my clothes when I read the 'S' word.
More Light
Sandro Zerafa (guitar), Yonathan Avishai (piano), Yoni Zelnik (bass), Lukmil Perez-Herrera (drums), David Prez (tenor sax).
Also a fourth album, Zerafa’s a native of Malta but now in Paris and he's absorbed Wes Montgomery, Jim Hall, Grant Green and Peter Bernstein. It's a multi-national band from Israel, Cuba and France and there's a slight, subtle Brazilian flavour running through for the many people this appeals to nowadays.
The album features nine originals with added bonus of sax on three of them, which elevates it above the Kohl album but, without which I doubt I could separate them in a blindfold test.
The songs are fine and the playing is excellent and the notes claim a certain contemporary cool, far removed from frenzy and fury, but to these ears it may have benefitted from a little F and F.   
Lance, I gather, was impressed by Zerafa’s previous album
A Future of Music.
We often speculate whether music will stand up to repeated listening, but maybe we're approaching it all wrong.
Go back a generation and most people watched films once but played albums incessantly until the fillers made as much sense as the hits. Go back another and most people only knew the hits.
Nowadays it's common for people to watch films over and over again so maybe it's okay to listen to albums a couple of times, maybe pull of a couple of key tracks or come back to it in the future, and then move on to the next album, while retaining the genuinely great albums.
Steve T.

No comments :

Post a Comment

Blog Archive

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Subscribe!